Game

Out There: Oceans of Time Review – A Starship In Need Of Repairs

While they don’t take up as much playtime as the spacefaring portion of the game, there are away missions that the player can find on some planets throughout their journey. While they are uncommon, they make for a nice change of pace from the typical gameplay, though they are a little barebones. Away missions task the player with creating a maximum four-man team with their available crew, and then navigating them through a hex tile map of the area of interest. The environments that these maps depict can be interesting and pretty, but the navigation itself is largely dull. There are no moving threats for the crew to combat or anything for them to do except park themselves on certain tiles in order to collect resources or experience text events. The only legitimate threats that can be found on these missions are hazardous tiles which can more often than not be avoided, or at least heavily neutered with items. It’s a fun system in theory and the rewards are plenty, but there is simply more style to it than substance.

Unfortunately, gameplay is not the only place where Out There falls short, as it also suffers in a technical capacity. At several seemingly random points throughout the time spent with the game, it crashed severely, to the point where even the computer it was being played on ceased responding to commands and needed to be rebooted. One particular instance saw a crash constantly occur at the end of one of the away missions during the results screen. Said mission had to be played three times in its entirety before a moment of luck allowed the game to advance beyond this point. This situation wouldn’t be as bad if it weren’t for the game’s save system, which only allows for the game to be continued on a single save file. There are checkpoints, but they are so infrequent that a true softlock could easily result in an hour’s worth of progression, or more, being removed at the whim of its instability.

While it may not tick every box in the quality department, there is something to be said for a game with an interesting core and Out There: Oceans of Time does hit that mark. It’s a story and universe that really offers a unique feeling sci-fi experience, and with a little time this ocean of stars could be more than worth flying through, even if there needs to be some more stability prior to that occurring.

Out There: Oceans of Time released on May 26th, 2022 for PC. Screen Rant was provided a digital Steam key for the purposes of this review.

Our Rating:

3 out of 5 (Good)


See more

Out There: Oceans of Time Review – A Starship In Need Of Repairs

While they don’t take up as much playtime as the spacefaring portion of the game, there are away missions that the player can find on some planets throughout their journey. While they are uncommon, they make for a nice change of pace from the typical gameplay, though they are a little barebones. Away missions task the player with creating a maximum four-man team with their available crew, and then navigating them through a hex tile map of the area of interest. The environments that these maps depict can be interesting and pretty, but the navigation itself is largely dull. There are no moving threats for the crew to combat or anything for them to do except park themselves on certain tiles in order to collect resources or experience text events. The only legitimate threats that can be found on these missions are hazardous tiles which can more often than not be avoided, or at least heavily neutered with items. It’s a fun system in theory and the rewards are plenty, but there is simply more style to it than substance.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Unfortunately, gameplay is not the only place where Out There falls short, as it also suffers in a technical capacity. At several seemingly random points throughout the time spent with the game, it crashed severely, to the point where even the computer it was being played on ceased responding to commands and needed to be rebooted. One particular instance saw a crash constantly occur at the end of one of the away missions during the results screen. Said mission had to be played three times in its entirety before a moment of luck allowed the game to advance beyond this point. This situation wouldn’t be as bad if it weren’t for the game’s save system, which only allows for the game to be continued on a single save file. There are checkpoints, but they are so infrequent that a true softlock could easily result in an hour’s worth of progression, or more, being removed at the whim of its instability.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

While it may not tick every box in the quality department, there is something to be said for a game with an interesting core and Out There: Oceans of Time does hit that mark. It’s a story and universe that really offers a unique feeling sci-fi experience, and with a little time this ocean of stars could be more than worth flying through, even if there needs to be some more stability prior to that occurring.

Out There: Oceans of Time released on May 26th, 2022 for PC. Screen Rant was provided a digital Steam key for the purposes of this review.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Our Rating:
3 out of 5 (Good)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-bta’); });

#Oceans #Time #Review #Starship #Repairs


Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button