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Ghostwire: Tokyo Review: A Stunning Supernatural Adventure

ghost wireTokyo’s revival of Tokyo is nothing short of impressive. The city is huge and highly detailed, including real-life restricted areas that are now home to urban legends about strange disappearances and mysterious spirits. This open world uses a variation of the fog of war mechanic; The map is not only obscured by the fog, but also actively deals damage to the player if they do not clear the Tori Gate from a nearby area.

Unlike other Ubisoft-style open-world towers, Tori Gates feels more justified in its presence due to Japan’s spiritual traditions. Tori Gates serve as a boundary between the spiritual and physical realms; So, cleaning the doors Ghostwire: Tokyo seals that restrain and remove the spiritual fog from the physical world. Unfortunately, the events in the story leave the physical world empty and, while there are a healthy number of side quests, make the world feel busier than life.

Visitors are easily the most dynamic part of the world. ghost wire‘ As they roam the streets in groups in Tokyo, and no matter how many times the player encounters them, they always make a statement. Visitors belong to a class of Japanese spirits known as Yokai, who are known to be more aggressive or sneaky, similar to the lesser demons in Jewish religions. Some of these visitors pointed out to players as possible references to ‘creepypasta’ horror story characters; The most common was the game’s Umbrella Man, which bears a striking resemblance to Slender Man. In reality, each of these Yokai is the personification of the negative emotions people feel when they die or are dragged into the fog.

main theme Ghostwire: Tokyo it is mainly the connection represented by holding wires. When Akito is close to defeating an enemy, there is a moment when the enemy’s core is exposed and Akito can dismantle it with his wire skill and finish them off. In Screen Rant’s latest interview Ghostwire: TokyoKenji Kimura and producer Masato Kimura stated that this mechanic is the act of connecting with these negative emotions and, in a way, removing them from spirits.

This is a theme that becomes increasingly complex as the story progresses, both in battle and in moments of silence. The relationship between Akito and KK is a prime example as the two initially opposed each other but got to know each other more closely. As the player barely realizes this is happening, Tango is a cleverly crafted affair offered by Gameworks. These moments occur multiple times throughout the game and are beautifully rendered each time.

every digit in Ghostwire: Tokyo, most notably the skull-headed villain Hannya. The “skull face” is actually a Hannya mask used in a Japanese theater called Noh. The mask itself represents a particular type of spirit and is designed to express a wide variety of emotions based solely on lighting and head placement. While Hannya’s character is somewhat shallow and undercooked, her presence and influence are anything but. His mask, character design, demeanor and displays of power are more than enough to make him an unforgettable and intimidating foe, something that also extends to his close circle of powerful people.

The three figures following Hannya, Ghostwire: Tokyomain bosses. They serve as a great test of player skill and none of them are particularly difficult when creating a challenge. Instead of trying to play like a dust player hand ringMargit and Radahn, these bosses test the player’s quick thinking and ability to synergize their abilities. Defeating them instills a sense of strength and progress into Akito’s character, inspiring the player to move forward to the next boss.

Combat itself is a mixed bag and has a few issues, possibly caused by the following. Ghostwire: Tokyo The studio’s first action-adventure game. The main issue is the camera’s control and target, both slow and stuttering. The player adapts to this and while aim assist is very helpful once discovered, thanks to DualSense it puts a small speck on a fun, unique and effective combat system that is a blast to use. Each basic skill serves a specific purpose, where wind is fast-firing medium DPS attack, water is low-damage crowd control weapon, and fire is powerful DPS attack with a large blast radius.

Generally, Ghostwire: Tokyo It features a unique combat system, fantastic storytelling, and a re-creation of its titular city that is complex and gripping, even if it feels a bit empty at times. For those looking for the main narrative, the game’s five chapters only take four hours to complete – but the side quests are well-written and players are encouraged to play them for extra unlocks like outfits and skill upgrades. Ghostwire: Tokyo It exceeds expectations and is well worth the time and money for anyone who is a little bit curious about this game.

ghost wire tokyo Available March 25 for PlayStation 5. Screen Rant was provided with a PS5 digital download code for the purposes of this review.

Our rating:

4.5 out of 5 (required)


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Ghostwire: Tokyo Review: A Stunning Supernatural Adventure

Ghostwire‘s recreation of Tokyo is nothing short of impressive. The city is massive and highly detailed, including real-life restricted areas that are currently home to urban legends about strange disappearances and mysterious spirits. This open world utilizes a variation of the fog-of-war mechanic where the map isn’t only obscured by fog, but it will actively damage the player if they do not cleanse a nearby area’s Tori Gate.
Unlike other Ubisoft-style open-world towers, the Tori Gates feel more justified in their existence due to the spiritual traditions of Japan. Tori Gates act as a boundary between the spiritual and physical realms; thus, cleansing the gates in Ghostwire: Tokyo seals that boundary and removes the spiritual fog from the physical world. Unfortunately, the events of the story leave the physical world feeling empty and while there are a healthy number of side-missions, it ultimately makes the world feel busy rather than alive.
The Visitors are easily the most dynamic part of Ghostwire‘s Tokyo, as they roam the streets in groups and always make a statement no matter how many times the player has encountered them. The Visitors belong to a class of Japanese spirits know as Yokai, who are known for being more aggressive or devious – similar to minor demons in Judaic religions. Some of these Visitors stood out to players as potential references to characters from ‘creepypasta’ horror stories, the most prevalent being the game’s Umbrella Man, who bares a striking resemblance to Slender Man. In reality, each of these Yokai are personifications of the negative emotions that people felt once they died or were taken by the fog.

The main theme of Ghostwire: Tokyo is connection, which is primarily represented by the titular wires. Whenever Akito is close to defeating an enemy, there is a moment where the enemy’s core is exposed and Akito can finish them off by ripping it out with their wire ability. In Screen Rant’s recent interview with the Ghostwire: Tokyo‘s Director Kenji Kimura and Producer Masato Kimura, they stated that this mechanic is an act of connecting with these negative emotions and, in a way, removing them from the spirits.
This is a theme that becomes more and more complex as the story progresses, both in combat and in the quiet moments. The relationship between Akito and KK are a prime example, as the the two initially oppose each other but grow to know one another more intimately. It’s a relationship that is brilliantly crafted and delivered by Tango Gameworks, as the player barely notices that it’s happening. These moments occur multiple times over the course of the game, and it is handled beautifully each and every time.
Of every figure in Ghostwire: Tokyo, the most memorable is the skull-faced villain, Hannya. The “skull-face” is actually a Hannya mask, which is used in a Japanese style of theatre called Noh. The mask itself is representative of a specific kind of spirit and is designed to express a wide variety of emotions based purely on lighting and how the head is positioned. While Hannya’s character is a bit shallow and undercooked, his presence and impact are anything but. His mask, character design, demeanor, and displays of power are more than enough to make him a memorable and intimidating enemy, something that also extends to his close circle of powered individuals.

The three figures that follow Hannya serve as Ghostwire: Tokyo‘s main bosses. They serve as a wonderful test of the player’s ability and while they pose a challenge, none are particularly difficult. Rather than try to pummel the player into dust like Elden Ring‘s Margit and Radahn, these bosses test the player’s quick thinking and ability to synergize their abilities. Defeating them instills a sense of power and progression for Akito’s character and inspire the player to push forward to the next boss.
Combat itself is a mixed bag and has a few issues that likely stem from Ghostwire: Tokyo being the studio’s first action-adventure title. The primary issue is the camera control and aiming, both of which feel sluggish and stuttery. While the player does adjust to this and the aim assist helps greatly once figured out, it puts a mild stain on what is otherwise an enjoyable, unique, and impactful combat system that is a blast to use thanks to the DualSense. Each elemental ability serves a specific purpose, where wind is the average rapid-fire DPS attack, water is the low damage crowd control weapon, and fire is the powerful DPS attack with a wide blast radius.
Overall, Ghostwire: Tokyo has a unique combat system, fantastic narrative, and a recreation of its titular city that is intricate and immersive, even if it feels a bit empty at times. For those looking to binge the main narrative, it only takes four hours to complete the game’s five chapters – however, the side-missions are well written, and players are highly encouraged to play through them to gain extra unlocks such as outfits and ability upgrades. Ghostwire: Tokyo exceeds expectations and to anyone that is even slightly curious about this game, it is well worth the time and money.
Ghostwire Tokyo is available on March 25 for PlayStation 5. Screen Rant was provided with a PS5 digital download code for the purpose of this review.

Our Rating:
4.5 out of 5 (Must-Play)

#Ghostwire #Tokyo #Review #Stunning #Supernatural #Adventure


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