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Everything Everywhere All At Once: 10 Funniest Letterboxd Reviews

In a hilarious oversimplification of Everything Everywhere‘s unashamedly maximalist story, one Letterboxd user describes the film as “mother deals with an angsty teenager(s)”. And whilst it’s skipping over a lot of details, the comment is a fairly accurate description of the film.

A lot of Everything Everywhere‘s story follows Evelyn as she attempts to take down the Alphaverse’s version of her daughter, which is traveling the multiverse and causing nothing but damage in her wake. Perhaps a little more destructive than most teenagers, then.

Unexpectedly Emotional

The final act of Everything Everywhere is surprisingly emotional, with the film taking a dark turn that has a lot to say about family, identity, and finding your place in the world. The climax of this genius commentary takes place in a universe where both Evelyn and her daughter are transformed into rocks, forced to talk through their problems rather than fight over them.

Letterboxd user Ian sums this up pretty effectively by writing “rocks just made me cry”, which is something that most audiences will certainly relate to. The scene in question is a perfect example of how words can be much more effective than actions – an idea that the film explores wonderfully.

Perfect Escapism

Everything Everywhere is probably one of the most rewatchable movies out there, primarily because of how many subtle details are sure to fly over audiences’ heads on the first viewing. It’s a film that gets better every time the audience watches it, which is why so many fans have found themselves watching the movie over and over again.

One of these people is letterboxd user demi adejuygibe, who wrote: “Honestly just avoiding work now”, which is something that all of us can relate to. Ironically, the film has a lot to say about the mundanity of everyday life, which could be why it’s such a comforting rewatch.

The Hot Dog Scenes

There are so many different universes that Evelyn visits throughout her adventure in the film, but one of the most memorable involves a branch of the human race that has evolved to have hot dogs in place of fingers. The film hilariously presents this, allowing for some amusingly disturbing scenes.

Letterboxd user diamondbolt asks: “If anyone knows how I can purge the hot dog finger scenes from my memory please contact me immediately”. And whilst these scenes are indeed pretty gross and unsettling, they’re exactly the reason that so many people love the film – proof that it doesn’t take itself too seriously.

An Unconventional Story

There are plenty of important messages to take away from Everything Everywhere, though a literal interpretation of the film’s bizarre story probably isn’t the best way to read it. Letterboxd user Stevie highlights this, writing: “Finally a movie about the omnipotent evil that is everything bagels.”

And whilst that’s true – the film does have a deadly bagel as its central threat – it is more concerned with the familial and personal conflicts at the heart of its story. Though a viewer might come for the evil bagel, they’re sure to leave with a deeper understanding of what it means to have a purpose in the universe.

Daniels’ Passion Project

Directing duo Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert (professionally known as Daniels) are the genius minds behind Everything Everywhere, and it feels like they’re the only people who can understand the minute details of their maximalist film.

An Emotional Rollercoaster

One of the most impressive aspects of Everything Everywhere is just how effectively it mixes comedy with tragedy, making its audience laugh just before hitting them with an emotional bombshell that will have them in tears.

Letterboxd user Lubchansky sums this up pretty well, writing: “I kept laughing in the way I do when I eat a really incredible bite of food and then also crying like I’d been shot”, which describes just how much of an emotional rollercoaster the film can be for many people.

Exceeds Expectations

Although the first reactions to Everything Everywhere were overwhelmingly positive, very few people could have predicted just how universally beloved this movie would become. It’s one of the most widely beloved movies of the past few years, and many fans are worried that their expectations are now too high for upcoming films.

“I’ll probably really hate this movie eventually for ruining every other movie for me”, says Letterboxd’s Aksel, clearly worried that no other film will ever live up to the greatness of Everything Everywhere – despite the wide range of films that audiences still have to look at forward to in 2022.

An Unforgettable Experience

“It is very possible that I will think about this movie every day for the rest of my life”, writes Letterboxd user Mulaney, perfectly summing up how plenty of audiences well about this one-of-a-kind movie. There are truly very few films quite like Everything Everywhere, which makes it almost impossible to stop thinking about.

There are plenty of important life lessons in Everything Everywhere, so the fact that it lingers in your mind long after the credits roll is a huge testament to its real-world relevance. It’s so much more than just a 2-hour experience, but is one that will stick with a viewer for long afterward.

A Well-Timed Multiverse Adventure

Although the multiverse isn’t particularly a concept that audiences find in most movies, Everything Everywhere‘s the biggest competition in theatres right now is another multiversal adventure in the form of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness.

Sam Raimi’s thrilling sequel to 2016’s Doctor Strange might have been divisive with critics, but there’s no denying that it was a huge hit with audiences. Nevertheless, many film fans are still supporting Daniels’ film – including Letterboxd user Maria, who wrote: “This is my Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness”.


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Everything Everywhere All At Once: 10 Funniest Letterboxd Reviews

In a hilarious oversimplification of Everything Everywhere‘s unashamedly maximalist story, one Letterboxd user describes the film as “mother deals with an angsty teenager(s)”. And whilst it’s skipping over a lot of details, the comment is a fairly accurate description of the film.
A lot of Everything Everywhere‘s story follows Evelyn as she attempts to take down the Alphaverse’s version of her daughter, which is traveling the multiverse and causing nothing but damage in her wake. Perhaps a little more destructive than most teenagers, then.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

Unexpectedly Emotional

The final act of Everything Everywhere is surprisingly emotional, with the film taking a dark turn that has a lot to say about family, identity, and finding your place in the world. The climax of this genius commentary takes place in a universe where both Evelyn and her daughter are transformed into rocks, forced to talk through their problems rather than fight over them.
Letterboxd user Ian sums this up pretty effectively by writing “rocks just made me cry”, which is something that most audiences will certainly relate to. The scene in question is a perfect example of how words can be much more effective than actions – an idea that the film explores wonderfully.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Perfect Escapism

Everything Everywhere is probably one of the most rewatchable movies out there, primarily because of how many subtle details are sure to fly over audiences’ heads on the first viewing. It’s a film that gets better every time the audience watches it, which is why so many fans have found themselves watching the movie over and over again.
One of these people is letterboxd user demi adejuygibe, who wrote: “Honestly just avoiding work now”, which is something that all of us can relate to. Ironically, the film has a lot to say about the mundanity of everyday life, which could be why it’s such a comforting rewatch.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

The Hot Dog Scenes

There are so many different universes that Evelyn visits throughout her adventure in the film, but one of the most memorable involves a branch of the human race that has evolved to have hot dogs in place of fingers. The film hilariously presents this, allowing for some amusingly disturbing scenes.
Letterboxd user diamondbolt asks: “If anyone knows how I can purge the hot dog finger scenes from my memory please contact me immediately”. And whilst these scenes are indeed pretty gross and unsettling, they’re exactly the reason that so many people love the film – proof that it doesn’t take itself too seriously.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

An Unconventional Story

There are plenty of important messages to take away from Everything Everywhere, though a literal interpretation of the film’s bizarre story probably isn’t the best way to read it. Letterboxd user Stevie highlights this, writing: “Finally a movie about the omnipotent evil that is everything bagels.”
And whilst that’s true – the film does have a deadly bagel as its central threat – it is more concerned with the familial and personal conflicts at the heart of its story. Though a viewer might come for the evil bagel, they’re sure to leave with a deeper understanding of what it means to have a purpose in the universe.
Daniels’ Passion Project

Directing duo Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert (professionally known as Daniels) are the genius minds behind Everything Everywhere, and it feels like they’re the only people who can understand the minute details of their maximalist film.
An Emotional Rollercoaster

One of the most impressive aspects of Everything Everywhere is just how effectively it mixes comedy with tragedy, making its audience laugh just before hitting them with an emotional bombshell that will have them in tears.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT6’); });

Letterboxd user Lubchansky sums this up pretty well, writing: “I kept laughing in the way I do when I eat a really incredible bite of food and then also crying like I’d been shot”, which describes just how much of an emotional rollercoaster the film can be for many people.
Exceeds Expectations

Although the first reactions to Everything Everywhere were overwhelmingly positive, very few people could have predicted just how universally beloved this movie would become. It’s one of the most widely beloved movies of the past few years, and many fans are worried that their expectations are now too high for upcoming films.
“I’ll probably really hate this movie eventually for ruining every other movie for me”, says Letterboxd’s Aksel, clearly worried that no other film will ever live up to the greatness of Everything Everywhere – despite the wide range of films that audiences still have to look at forward to in 2022.
An Unforgettable Experience

“It is very possible that I will think about this movie every day for the rest of my life”, writes Letterboxd user Mulaney, perfectly summing up how plenty of audiences well about this one-of-a-kind movie. There are truly very few films quite like Everything Everywhere, which makes it almost impossible to stop thinking about.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT7’); });

There are plenty of important life lessons in Everything Everywhere, so the fact that it lingers in your mind long after the credits roll is a huge testament to its real-world relevance. It’s so much more than just a 2-hour experience, but is one that will stick with a viewer for long afterward.
A Well-Timed Multiverse Adventure

Although the multiverse isn’t particularly a concept that audiences find in most movies, Everything Everywhere‘s the biggest competition in theatres right now is another multiversal adventure in the form of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness.
Sam Raimi’s thrilling sequel to 2016’s Doctor Strange might have been divisive with critics, but there’s no denying that it was a huge hit with audiences. Nevertheless, many film fans are still supporting Daniels’ film – including Letterboxd user Maria, who wrote: “This is my Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness”.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

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